Prepare for Winter


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Time to Prepare for Winter Weather

Now is the time to prepare for snow, ice and strong winds. It is important to prepare since winter weather can cause power outages resulting in the loss of heat, water or communications to our homes and businesses. With the projected strong El Nino pattern for winter 2015-2016, we suggest that you check out – http://www.ready.gov/winter-weather for a list of ways to prepare.

Preparing for winter storms is similar to preparing for other emergencies like floods or wildfires. Following the three steps below, can help your family be prepared for most winter events.

Step 1: Make an emergency supply kit which includes items like non-perishable food, water, batteries, flashlights and a hand crank radio. Add the following items for winter: rock salt, sand, snow shovels and adequate clothing and blankets to keep you warm.

Step 2: Make a family emergency plan. You may not be with your family when a storm hits, so know how to contact one another.

Step 3: Make sure your home is well insulated and that you have weather stripping around your doors and windows. Insulate pipes with insulation or newspapers and plastic and allow faucets to drip a little during cold weather to help avoid freezing. Keep fire extinguishers on hand and make sure everyone in your family knows how to use it. House fires pose an additional risk as more people turn to alternate heating sources without taking the proper safety precautions.

Lastly, remember where to find storm updates. An excellent source for weather forecasts and weather warnings is http://www.wrh.noaa.gov/fgz/. You can dial 311 from any phone for updates from the Health Department, Emergency Management, Fire and Forest information. You can go online to 311info.net as well as watch the news or listen to the radio for weather updates. If you have any further questions please contact Apache County Public Health Service District, 928-333-6430.

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Urge State and Federal Agencies to End the War on Wolves

Speak up for wolves at September Commission Meetings and call US Fish and Wildlife Service

For years, scientists have warned that more Mexican gray wolves must be released into the wild to improve the wild population’s declining genetic health.

But Arizona’s and New Mexico’s state wildlife agencies are WolfPhotoblocking the release of new wolves.

And the U.S. Fish and Wildlife is deferring  to these states that are clearly hostile to wolves, instead of exercising its federal authority to ensure the recovery of endangered Mexican gray wolves.

All three of these agencies need to hear from wolf advocates. And both states’ wildlife commissions have meetings this month, with Mexican gray wolves on the agenda.
Speak for wolves at the Arizona Game and Fish Commission meeting on Friday, September 4th.

Springerville Town Hall
418 E Main St
Springerville, AZ
Or by Video Teleconference from any regional office except Tucson

The meeting begins at 8 am. The wolf briefing is item 5 on the ShameOnFishAndGameagenda.
Email info@mexicanwolves.org for more information.
The Arizona Game and Fish Commission has a long history of ignoring the best available science and interfering with recovery of these highly endangered animals, including blocking releases of new wolves into the wild, needed to boost the wolves’ declining genetic health, and asking Arizona members of Congress to remove the wolves’ Endangered Species Act protections.

The Commission also pressured the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to loosen restrictions on killing and trapping wolves, to keep wolves from key habitats north of I-40, and to limit the wolf population to a number far below what experts say is needed to reduce the risk of extinction. During the period from 2003 – 2009, when the Adaptive Management Oversight Committee (AMOC) led by Arizona Game and Fish managed the wolf reintroduction project, the wild population declined from 55 to only 42 wolves and 2 breeding pairs.

At their last meeting, the Commission went a step further to undermine wolf recovery, by voting to ban all releases of adult Mexican gray wolves from the 250 wolves in captivity.

You can call or email the members of the Arizona Game and Fish Commission using the talking points and contact information at the bottom of the post here. You can also sign the petition here.
LittleRedRidingHoodLied

Stand for wolves at the New Mexico Game Commission meeting in Albuquerque on Tuesday, September 29th.

Albuquerque, New Mexico
September 29, 2015
Embassy Suites
1000 Woodward Place NE
9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Agenda item no. 7 is “Action to be Taken on United States Fish and Wildlife Service Appeal of the Denial of Application to Release Mexican Gray Wolves.” For more information, email info@mexicanwolves.org.

Super Predators

http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/projects/cp/summer-of-science-2015/latest/predator

Looking at Humans as ‘Super Predators’

The outrage following the killing of Cecil the lion by an American hunter last month was a stark reminder of a role that humans hold in nature: top predator.

We hunt not just lions and tigers, but also bears, wolves, deer and elk. We fish tuna, seabass, swordfish and salmon. We kill for food and sport.

But here’s a “what if?”: What if humans were considered as just another predator within the global ecosystem, rather than apart from it? How do our predatory habits compare with those of other top carnivores like lions, bears and sharks?

 

Wrenched: The Movie

 

 WrenchLettering
EDWARD ABBEY is often called the “Thoreau of the American West.” Infamous for his viewsWRENCHED banner wtext_01 on the environment and his criticism of public land policies, Abbey emerged from the early sixties conservationist movement with a uniquely sharp wit and sardonic sense of humor. His stories warn about the consequences of commercial over-development in the Southwest. The movie Wrenched chronicles Abbey’s indelible influence on conservation of the Southwest’s vast landscapes and preservation of its wild areas, an influence that endures 20 years after his death and release of his final novel.After the movie, the Conservation League will share highlights of key local issues and how attendees can help conserve and protect the White Mountain’s natural and wild areas for generations to come.

Ed George, a Flagstaff cinematographer who helped film Wrenched, will introduce the movie.

WHEN AND WHERE
Aug 8, 2015
3:00 PM (Free refreshments at 2:45)

White Mountain Nature Center is located off Highway 260 in Lakeside between the Big Springs Environmental Study Area and the Mountain Meadow Recreation Complex.

Learn more at http://wrenched-themovie.com/

SPONSORED BY
THE WHITE MOUNTAIN
CONSERVATION LEAGUE

Hosted by:
White Mountain Nature Center
425 South Woodland Road
Lakeside, AZ 85935

 

Click to view this email in a browserIf you no longer wish to receive these emails, please reply to this message with “Unsubscribe” in the subject line or simply click on the following link: Unsubscribe
White Mountain Conservation League
Box 595
Pinetop, Arizona 85935
USRead the VerticalResponse marketing policy.

 

Enter Now: Grand Canyon Wolf Naming Contest!

Open to children and youth under 18- deadline Thursday, December 4

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has confirmed, through DNA tests on scat, that there is a female northern Rockies gray wolf on the Kaibab National Forest, near the north rim of Grand Canyon National Park in Arizona.

This brave female is the first wolf in this area for more than 70 years! This historic and cause for celebration!

We think this amazing pioneer inhabiting an area where wolves once thrived deserves a special name. That’s why groups from all over the west are working together on this contest!

You must be under age 18 to enter. If you would like to help name this unique animal and be part of his or her story, please fill out the form here with your parent or legal guardian*: http://goo.gl/forms/WqfkUrdtTl

The deadline to enter is December 4, 2014

The winning name will be announced by Monday, December 8, 2014.

Background information:

The Kaibab Plateau has forested lands with elevations up to 9,000 feet, surrounded by the sage, grasslands and canyons of lower elevations. It is bordered on the south by the Grand Canyon, on the east and west by tributary canyons of the Colorado River, and on the north by plains that are dissected by the tiers of uplifted cliffs of the Grand Staircase.

Wolves were once native to this part of the Grand Canyon region, but were wiped out by a federal extermination program in the early 1900’s. Scientists say this area is great habitat for wolves.

Mexican gray wolves, a subspecies of gray wolves, live in Arizona and New Mexico but the government won’t allow them to live north of Interstate 40. Gray wolves from the northern Rocky Mountains are mostly in states north of Utah and Colorado and are bigger than Mexican gray wolves, or lobos.

Gray wolves are legendary for traveling long distances, and this wolf would have have traveled hundreds of miles from her home in Wyoming or another Rocky Mountain state through Utah and into Arizona.

Gray wolves are currently federally protected under the Endangered Species Act in Arizona. If this is a wolf, the government should do all in its power to protect her or him.

Wolves are intelligent, feeling animals who often live in families (packs) with their mates, siblings, and pups. Sometimes, like this animal, they travel long distances from their original family to find a mate and start a family of their own.


Enter the contest here
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Thank you for helping!

*The information entered in the form will not be used for any commercial purpose or shared with anyone not involved in the contest except for publicity about the contest.

Photos courtesy of National Park Service staff and AZ Game and Fish Department

From mexicanwolves.org